© American Woodline Incorporated
Thanks for visiting the Useful Information page of American Woodline.com.  On these pages you will find a lot of information that will assist you in making the best choices for your furniture purchase.  We try to provide you with all the knowledge that you will need to make an informed decision on your furniture.  Please tell us if there is more information you would like to see here. 

1012b Greeley Avenue, Union NJ 07083

Hours: Mon to Sat: 10-6        Sun: Closed

AmericanWoodline.com Quality Unpainted Furniture

PARTICLE BOARD 

At    American    Woodline,    we    help you     realize     your     dreams.          Our product      line      is      an      extensive collection      of      the      best      quality unpainted    furniture    on    the    East Coast.        We    provide    professional quality    finishing    at    a    reasonable price, or you can finish it yourself. We    also    provide    expert    advice    to help   you   make   the   most   from   your purchase.    Call us today!
MADE IN USA
Over 20 Years in Business

Ph:  908 349 0204

PARTICLE BOARD

MDF

Janka Rating: n/a

Finishing of Particle Board

American   Woodline   is   a   real   wood   furniture   suplier   which   means   that   the   furniture   we   sell   does not   contain   any   particle   board.      In   addition,   particle   board   typically   comes   with   a   veneer   that   replicates wood grain or some other appearance.  (Ref_http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Particle_board) Characteristics Particleboard   is   cheaper,   denser   and   more   uniform   than   conventional   wood   and   plywood   and   is substituted     for     them     when     appearance     and     strength     are     less     important     than     cost.     However, particleboard   can   be   made   more   attractive   by   painting   or   the   use   of   wood   veneers   onto   surfaces   that will   be   visible.   Though   it   is   denser   than   conventional   wood,   it   is   the   lightest   and   weakest   type   of fiberboard,   except   for   insulation   board.   Medium-density   fibreboard   and   hardboard,   also   called   high- density   fiberboard,   are   stronger   and   denser   than   particleboard.   Different   grades   of   particleboard   have different   densities,   with   higher   density   connoting   greater   strength   and   greater   resistance   to   failure   of screw fasteners. A   major   disadvantage   of   particleboard   is   that   it   is   very   prone   to   expansion   and   discoloration   due   to moisture,   particularly   when   it   is   not   covered   with   paint   or   another   sealer.   Therefore,   it   is   rarely   used outdoors   or   places   that   have   high   levels   of   moisture,   with   the   exception   of   some   bathrooms,   kitchens and   laundries,   where   it   is   commonly   used   as   an   underlayment   beneath   a   continuous   sheet   of   vinyl flooring.   It   does,   however,   have   some   advantages   when   it   comes   to   constructing   the   cabinet   box   and shelves.    For    example,    it    is    well    suited    for    attaching    cabinet    door    hinges    to    the    sides    of    frameless cabinets.   Plywood   has   the   potential   to   feather   off   in   sheaves   when   extreme   weight   is   placed   on   the hinges. In contrast, particle board holds the screws in place under similar weight.

Safety

Safety   concerns   are   two   part,   one   being   fine   dust   released   when   particleboard   is   machined   (e.g., sawing   or   routing),   and   occupational   exposure   limits   exist   in   many   countries   recognizing   the   hazard   of wood   dusts.   The   other   concern   is   with   the   release   of   formaldehyde.   In   1984   concerns   about   the   initial indoor   level   of   formaldehyde   led   the   United   States   Department   of   Housing   and   Urban   Development   to set   standards   for   construction   of   manufactured   homes.   This   however   was   not   solely   because   of   the   large amounts   of   pressed   wood   products   that   manufactured   homes   contain   but   also   because   of   other   building materials   such   as   Urea-formaldehyde   foam   insulation.      Formaldehyde   is   classified   by   the   WHO   as   a known human carcinogen.

Comparison of solid wood to particleboard

Particleboard’s   selling   points   compared   to   solid   timber   are   its   low   cost,   its   availability   in   large   flat sheets, and its ability to be decorated with all kinds of overlays. Solid   wood   has   structural   advantages   over   particleboard.   It   is   stronger,   particularly   in   tension   (as required   for   horizontal   spans),   allowing   it   to   support   greater   weights.   Unless   adequately   braced   or   built with thick material, particleboard shelves will visibly sag over time (or snap near the fasteners). Screw    fasteners    should    be    installed    with    caution,    taking    into    account    the    specific    mechanical properties   of   particleboard.   Otherwise,   these   will   not   provide   the   correct   holding   power,   over   time. There   is   a   tendency,   for   improperly   installed   screws   to   strip   the   material   into   which   they   are   inserted. For    example,    over-torquing    a    screw    will,    over    time,    lead    to    premature    failure    of    the    material.    The tolerance   to   over-torquing   is   less   for   particleboard   as   compared   to   ply-   or   solid   wood.   Portions   of   the particleboard   may   "blow   out"   when   subjected   to   excessive   tension   stress.   In   part,   this   arises   from   the lack    of    elasticity    in    particleboard    resins    as    compared    to    the    long    strands    and    compressible    voids contained   in   solid   wood,   a   feature   that,   while   preserved   in   the   manufacture   of   plywood,   is   compromised in particleboard. The   strength   of   particleboard,   in   the   context   of   application   and   cost,   can   offer   advantages   over solid   wood   when   the   cost   is   virtually   the   sole   consideration.   In   cabinet   carcase   construction,   relatively thick   particleboard   is   used   (typically   ¾"),   particularly   in   the   sidewalls   to   support   compressive   loads   of countertops and appliances, where its lower cost and adequate strength make it a frequent choice. Solid   wood   is   much   more   durable   than   particleboard:   for   example,   damage   to   solid   wood   can   be repaired   by   removing   and   replacing   damaged   material,   then   refinishing   using   known   wood   treatments, that   can   be   matched.   Since   particleboard   is   typically   faced   with   by   a   non-wood   veneer,   it   is   practically impossible   to   match   the   original   finish.   In   addition,   damage   to   particleboard   is   typified   by   structural failure   and   exposure   of   sizable   jagged   faults.   Damage   to   particleboard   is   therefore   normally   impossible to   repair   effectively,   that   is   without   too   obvious   traces,   usually   requiring   replacement   of   the   whole damaged part(s). The   reduced   durability   of   particleboard   furniture   is   a   consequence   of   reduced   strength   in   tension. This    drawback    contributes    to    damage    when    furniture    is    carelessly    handled,    or    dragged.    Whenever possible   therefore,   the   furniture   should   be   disassembled   into   smaller   components,   easily   handled   by one person, to eliminate the possibility of damage in transit. Furniture   makers   often   cover   particleboard   with   real   or   imitation   veneers,   in   an   effort   to   simulate the look of solid wood.
© American Woodline Incorporated
AmericanWoodline.com Quality Unpainted Furniture

PARTICLE BOARD 

MADE IN USA
Over 20 Years in Business

PARTICLE BOARD

MDF

Janka Rating: n/a

Finishing of Particle Board

American   Woodline   is   a   real   wood   furniture   suplier   which means   that   the   furniture   we   sell   does   not   contain   any   particle board.      In   addition,   particle   board   typically   comes   with   a   veneer that     replicates     wood     grain     or     some     other     appearance.     (Ref_http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Particle_board) Characteristics Particleboard   is   cheaper,   denser   and   more   uniform   than conventional    wood    and    plywood    and    is    substituted    for    them when   appearance   and   strength   are   less   important   than   cost. However,   particleboard   can   be   made   more   attractive   by   painting or   the   use   of   wood   veneers   onto   surfaces   that   will   be   visible. Though   it   is   denser   than   conventional   wood,   it   is   the   lightest and    weakest    type    of    fiberboard,    except    for    insulation    board. Medium-density    fibreboard    and    hardboard,    also    called    high- density   fiberboard,   are   stronger   and   denser   than   particleboard. Different   grades   of   particleboard   have   different   densities,   with higher      density      connoting      greater      strength      and      greater resistance to failure of screw fasteners. A    major    disadvantage    of    particleboard    is    that    it    is    very prone     to     expansion     and     discoloration     due     to     moisture, particularly   when   it   is   not   covered   with   paint   or   another   sealer. Therefore,   it   is   rarely   used   outdoors   or   places   that   have   high levels    of    moisture,    with    the    exception    of    some    bathrooms, kitchens    and    laundries,    where    it    is    commonly    used    as    an underlayment   beneath   a   continuous   sheet   of   vinyl   flooring.   It does,     however,     have     some     advantages     when     it     comes     to constructing   the   cabinet   box   and   shelves.   For   example,   it   is   well suited     for     attaching     cabinet     door     hinges     to     the     sides     of frameless   cabinets.   Plywood   has   the   potential   to   feather   off   in sheaves    when    extreme    weight    is    placed    on    the    hinges.    In contrast,   particle   board   holds   the   screws   in   place   under   similar weight.

Safety

Safety   concerns   are   two   part,   one   being   fine   dust   released when   particleboard   is   machined   (e.g.,   sawing   or   routing),   and occupational      exposure      limits      exist      in      many      countries recognizing   the   hazard   of   wood   dusts.   The   other   concern   is   with the   release   of   formaldehyde.   In   1984   concerns   about   the   initial indoor   level   of   formaldehyde   led   the   United   States   Department of     Housing     and     Urban     Development     to     set     standards     for construction    of    manufactured    homes.    This    however    was    not solely   because   of   the   large   amounts   of   pressed   wood   products that    manufactured    homes    contain    but    also    because    of    other building   materials   such   as   Urea-formaldehyde   foam   insulation.     Formaldehyde    is    classified    by    the    WHO    as    a    known    human carcinogen.

Comparison of solid wood to particleboard

Particleboard’s   selling   points   compared   to   solid   timber   are its   low   cost,   its   availability   in   large   flat   sheets,   and   its   ability   to be decorated with all kinds of overlays. Solid   wood   has   structural   advantages   over   particleboard.   It is   stronger,   particularly   in   tension   (as   required   for   horizontal spans),      allowing      it      to      support      greater      weights.      Unless adequately    braced    or    built    with    thick    material,    particleboard shelves will visibly sag over time (or snap near the fasteners). Screw   fasteners   should   be   installed   with   caution,   taking into       account       the       specific       mechanical       properties       of particleboard.    Otherwise,    these    will    not    provide    the    correct holding   power,   over   time.   There   is   a   tendency,   for   improperly installed    screws    to    strip    the    material    into    which    they    are inserted.    For    example,    over-torquing    a    screw    will,    over    time, lead   to   premature   failure   of   the   material.   The   tolerance   to   over- torquing   is   less   for   particleboard   as   compared   to   ply-   or   solid wood.    Portions    of    the    particleboard    may    "blow    out"    when subjected   to   excessive   tension   stress.   In   part,   this   arises   from the   lack   of   elasticity   in   particleboard   resins   as   compared   to   the long   strands   and   compressible   voids   contained   in   solid   wood,   a feature   that,   while   preserved   in   the   manufacture   of   plywood,   is compromised in particleboard. The   strength   of   particleboard,   in   the   context   of   application and   cost,   can   offer   advantages   over   solid   wood   when   the   cost   is virtually   the   sole   consideration.   In   cabinet   carcase   construction, relatively   thick   particleboard   is   used   (typically   ¾"),   particularly in   the   sidewalls   to   support   compressive   loads   of   countertops and    appliances,    where    its    lower    cost    and    adequate    strength make it a frequent choice. Solid   wood   is   much   more   durable   than   particleboard:   for example,   damage   to   solid   wood   can   be   repaired   by   removing and   replacing   damaged   material,   then   refinishing   using   known wood   treatments,   that   can   be   matched.   Since   particleboard   is typically    faced    with    by    a    non-wood    veneer,    it    is    practically impossible   to   match   the   original   finish.   In   addition,   damage   to particleboard   is   typified   by   structural   failure   and   exposure   of sizable    jagged    faults.    Damage    to    particleboard    is    therefore normally    impossible    to    repair    effectively,    that    is    without    too obvious    traces,    usually    requiring    replacement    of    the    whole damaged part(s). The    reduced    durability    of    particleboard    furniture    is    a consequence    of    reduced    strength    in    tension.    This    drawback contributes   to   damage   when   furniture   is   carelessly   handled,   or dragged.   Whenever   possible   therefore,   the   furniture   should   be disassembled   into   smaller   components,   easily   handled   by   one person, to eliminate the possibility of damage in transit. Furniture   makers   often   cover   particleboard   with   real   or imitation    veneers,    in    an    effort    to    simulate    the    look    of    solid wood.

USEFUL INFORMATION

1012b Greeley Avenue, Union New Jersey 07083

Store Hours:  Mon-Sat 10am to 6pm     Sun-Closed

Phone 908 349 0204

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